Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘support group’

As of this week my blogs will be posted on our website as our homepage: hopeforhurtingparents.com  We appreciate yourfragile1 patience as my dear husband re-builds the site. It’s gonna be great!

When your child is diagnosed with a mental illness it can feel overwhelming. You may become depressed and fearful not knowing what to expect or how to respond. I did. A stranger to the world of mental health, it was all foreign to me. If that describes you, read my last four blogs. They’re all about mental illness. They’ll help educate you, strengthen you and lessen your fears. In today’s blog I’m going to share 3 things I wish someone had told me when I first learned of my daughter’s mental health challenges. I think they’ll help you.

 

1. Your child is still the same person. (more…)

Read Full Post »

SurrenderWhen someone you love is diagnosed with a mental illness (major depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, PTSD, OCD) something very ugly tends to rear its head. I call it the two-headed monster of stigma and shame. It finds life from those who don’t understand because they’re either uninformed or misinformed. When it’s directed at your son or daughter the hurt runs deep. You feel protective. Defensive. But maybe you felt this way toward them yourself.

You need to hear these things:

  • Don’t believe your child’s value in this world is diminished because of their mental illness. (more…)

Read Full Post »

When your child is addicted to a substance or behavior, whether it’s pornography, gambling, cutting, binging and purging or to depression20 another person, it has a huge impact on us as their parent. If they suffer with a mental illness – Depression, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, PTSD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or an Anxiety Disorder it hurts us, too. If they’re gay or confused about their sexuality we’re affected as well.

Their pain is ours. We’re connected on a deep level, especially us moms. And sometimes we develop unhealthy, addictive behaviors ourselves.

What are you addicted to?

Getting your Way? “My child better please me and do what I told them; they need to live up to my expectations, or else.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is an informative, compassionate blog to help parents understand self-harm/self-injury and their children who struggle with it. It’s thoughtfully written by Stacy Flury, a mom who’s daughter was a cutter. She She understands. She gets it. She also offers some great resources. You can follow her at Anchor of Promise.Self-Harm: It Isn't Just Cutting - Anchor Of Promise

There is a show called, “Strange Addictions” that covers a huge gamut of self-prescribed addictive behaviors from licking the fur off of a cat and eating it, stinging yourself with bees or even sniffing/snorting moth balls. Although there were many other strange and peculiar self-harming addictions, some common factors stood out.

Many found their addiction as a way of coping with other issues in their life. Secondly, some of these types of addictions also suffered from other mental health disorders. When listening to their stories, they often mention a pivotal point in their life that triggered this issue.

So with this post, I would like to discuss some of the ways teen boys and girls utilize self-harm to help them get through everyday life. My hope is that it will bring some type of awareness of the very serious dangers of self-injury.

Although there are many avenues to self-harm, we will focus on some of the most pronounced type of self-injury among pre-teens to young adult.

Cutting – using anything sharp that cuts open the skin. Usually found on wrists, arms ankles, stomach and other areas where it can be concealed. Majority of cutters are girls between the ages of 10-19 however boys are on the rise of self-mutilation.

Object Impact – banging and punching objects to cause bruising and bleeding – mostly seen in boys.

Self-Impact – banging or punching self to cause bruising and bleeding – again, mostly seen in boys.

Carving words or symbols into the skin –  it is not the same as cutting; more of a lasting effect (like tattooing) to be reminded of what they are feeling emotionally or symbolizing that emotion.

Hair pulling – a compulsive desire to pull out hair.

Burning – burning skin using cigarettes, lighters, curling iron, etc.

Healing interference – habitual touching, peeling, pulling, adding foreign substance, etc. to wound so that healing will not be complete.

Scratching or Pinching – using objects or fingers to cause bruising, bleeding and ripped skin.

Eating Foreign Objects – paper, glue, play dough, cotton balls, etc.

So the question is asked to a self-harmer about why they self-harm. For some, they do not know how they started or why they do it. For many, it has involved stress, anxiety, and depression. For others, it is a coping skill learned when life got out of control. For them, this is something that they can control in their mind.

Those who suffer from anxiety, depression, suicidal tendencies, eating disorders, broken families, PTSD, sexual abuse and incest are more prone to self-harm than others.

 

Dear God, please comfort the many parents reading this whose son or daughter struggles with self-injury.  Calm their fears. Give them understanding and increased compassion for their child’s inner pain. And give wisdom to know what to do.

On Sunday I will post Part 2 of this blog when Stacy will address the reasons behind cutting.

 

Anchor Of Promise

Self-Harm: It Isn't Just Cutting - Anchor Of Promise
There is a show called, “Strange Addictions” that covers a huge gamut of self-prescribed addictive behaviors from licking the fur off of a cat and eating it, stinging yourself with bees or even sniffing/snorting moth balls. Although there were many other strange and peculiar self-harming addictions, some common factors stood out.

Many found their addiction as a way of coping with other issues in their life. Secondly, some of these types of addictions also suffered from other mental health disorders. When listening to their stories, they often mention a pivotal point in their life that triggered this issue.

So with this post, I would like to discuss some of the ways teen boys and girls utilize self-harm to help them get through everyday life. My hope is that it will bring some type of awareness of the very serious dangers of self-injury.

Although there are many avenues to self-harm, we…

View original post 837 more words

Read Full Post »

Today’s post is a re-blog written by Stacy Flury. Check out her blog for parents of hurting or troubled teens at Anchor of Promise.

When parents with teens in crisis get overwhelmed with no hope, they start a process within them to protect their heart. It’s despaircalled, “Detachment”. For many parents, this is not something willingly expressed but instead suppressed. If you think about it, how many moms and dads with teens in crisis are willing to openly share their true feelings as a parent?

While many do not want to talk about it, they often want to run away from it. For some, the idea of not knowing if they will wake up to hear that their teen overdosed on drugs, cut themselves so much that they ended up in the hospital, or ran off with a total stranger, it can be very distressing. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Are you the parent who can relate to one of these situations? Your son is in jail with an unknown outcome looming in the future.love Your daughter is fresh out of rehab, not the first time, living in your home again. They have a gambling problem that’s slowly destroying their life; they’re in denial that they drink too much, or abuse their prescription meds; they refuse treatment for a brain disorder; they’ve rejected you and want nothing to do with you because of a position you took regarding their choice of lifestyle; they have a same-sex partner; or they’re undergoing medical treatment to become transgender. How can you have joy at Christmas?

Maybe by letting go of expectations about what you have no control over will help. If you can lower what you expect from your child, it can do wonders. Otherwise, frustrations build up. You become hurt and angry. Discussing this with other parents I’ve realized we need to distinguish the difference between goals and desires. This is lead to joy – even during the holidays. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Flowers growing out of the ashes of Mt. St. Helens

Flowers growing out of the ashes of Mt. St. Helens

September was Suicide Prevention Month. I know it’s October now, but I still wanted to share some great resources to help parents (or anyone) who is recovering from a suicide (or any death).  A dear friend of mine lost her husband to suicide a little over seven years ago. Her life has changed forever – so has her children’s. But as a result, God led her on a healing journey that resulted in her becoming a mental health counselor.

In this post I’m going to share her favorite books. Finding good resources to help with such a difficult grief isn’t easy. As Christians, we have a different world view that affects how we cope with death, but suicide is a horse of a different color. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: